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ASTER CLINICAL TRANSPLANT NURSING PROGRAM

The three month certificate course(9 June 2017 to 9 sept 2017)in transplantation nursing concluded today. 30 nurses from four hospitals in three states attended. There was a two month online didactic program with live lectures from within India and abroad followed by a one month competency and skills assessment, as well as peer initiated teaching and shadowing senior nurses in icu. Lalita and Sumana from Mohan foundation conducted the soft skills and communication course.Mohan foundation conducted the grief counseling and

A FATTY LIVER LEADS TO A BROKEN HEART?

Strict Monitoring of Cardiovascular Disease Recommended When Managing Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is primarily the cause of death of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The extent to which NAFLD itself, rather than associated conditions such as diabetes, obesity, or dyslipidemia, is responsible for increased cardiovascular death has been a matter of debate. In a new study, investigators from the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Pierre and Marie Curie University conclude that NAFLD is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis

RESEARCHERS CONVERT CIRRHOSIS-CAUSING CELLS TO HEALTHY LIVER CELLS

Advances in stem cell research have made it possible to convert patients’ skin cells into heart cells, kidney cells, liver cells and more in the lab dish, giving researchers hope that one day such cells could replace organ transplantation for patients with organ failure. But successfully grafting these cells into patients’ failing organs remains a major clinical challenge. Now a team of researchers led by UC San Francisco scientists has demonstrated in mice that it is possible to generate healthy new

LIVER CANCER RISK LINGERS AFTER HEPATITIS B VIRUS CLEARED

For some people, hepatitis B is a short illness, but for others, it can become long term or chronic and lead to serious liver problems, including cirrhosis and liver cancer. Now, new research finds that the risk of liver cancer persists even after the virus is cleared, suggesting that people who have had the illness should continue to be monitored. For their study, the researchers selected participants from a group of 1,346 Alaska-Native patients with chronic HBV infection who were followed